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20130115
20130123
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
'm jumping ahead a little bit but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress. it was from day one in this country and the year we give an address to the nation and the congress. roosevelt in 1934 set on set on getting it in the many calls at the state of the union. a lot of these terms which were created by presidents we think are there from day one and in fact they are ones that have been in it later. and again some of them are just wonderful. let me just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term first lady. that did not exist in the applied it to dolley madison and the first that anyone had used that term. he referred to as the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was keep the ball rolling. jumping around a little bit but woodrow wilson had potomac fever which was something that harry truman loved to quote. politics is adjourned was woodrow wilson. watchful waiting was very closely associated with woodrow wilson. first in his relationship to the dictatorship in mexico where there was a lot of feeling that we should go in and interven
is jefferson's own work. >> franklin roosevelt had fireside chats. did he claim that he came up with that phrase? or was it the commentator that introduced in? butcher was on cbs, he was the guy who invented him. roosevelt wasn't prepared for it. robert trout was the one who introduced him for the fireside chat. but the word -- he wasn't sure at first. but again, a quick digression. but i've done some baseball writing. one of the things i found out is that when roosevelt started to write the fireside chats, he's a slightly aristocratic individual and he wants to talk to the american people. and he feels that he is coaching them out of the depression. and he starts using baseball heavily. and he said, you know, i just can't get the first base of this legislation where there is some member of the opposite party. so he would use these metaphors. it was then picked up by eisenhower. it is based on football. and that sort of becomes a big change in language. the president takes on a popular metaphor for explaining things. and it was explained in much more legislative, bureaucratic ty
of a president to name something, i'm jumping ahead a little bit, but in 1934 franklin d. roosevelt was going to give his annual address to congress and was from day one in this country the president at the beginning of the year would give an address to the nation and to the congress. and roosevelt in 1934 says, oh, i'll give it a name, calls it the state of the union. so a lot of these terms which are sort of created by presidents we think are, um, they are from day one. in fact, they're ones that have been added later. and, again, some of them are just wonderful. i mean, i'll just jump to a couple. zachary taylor created the term "first lady." he applied it to dolly madison. that was the first anyone had ever used that term. he said the first lady of the land. benjamin harrison was "keep the ball rolling." i'm jumping around a little bit, but it's sort of fun. woodrow wilson had potomac fever which was something harry truman love offed to quote. -- loved to quote. watchful waiting was very closely associated with woodrow waiting first in his relationship to the dictatorship in mexico where
. >> this is from this morning's "washington post." you can draw an analogy to two former president, franklin roosevelt and dwight eisenhower, finding parallels to what fdr delivered in his second address in 1937, and what eisenhower faced in 1957. >> the roosevelt second inaugural address is interesting to read because it really is of a peace with first inaugural. the president said, i came in with a huge crisis, i have been leading this country through, we're on the right path. we are going to keep going. he has a phrase in there -- have we found our happy valley? it was a very fine speech. i would have to go back and look at it again. i do not read it as being an aggressive speak. he was speaking to the whole country, but he was not in campaign mode. roosevelt was very good in that way. of course, eisenhower never sounded like that. >> that speech is recognized as one of the better second inaugurals. i think it does echoes some of the themes of obama, president obama. one of back and look the lines in that speech is, i see a nation ill-clothed -- one-third of the nation. he talked about in
a kind of speech that franklin roosevelt did which he has studied for his second inaugural which was a pretty tough speech. >> and what's the first test in your view, john? whether the president -- he'll talk bipartisanship tomorrow, but will he act bipartisan? >> i mean, it's fascinating because some of the proposals he's made that have already come under fire, for example, reporting republican chuck hagel as secretary of defense has not gone over well with republicans, especially the neoconservative crowd. so that outreach which traditionally would be bridge building has actually in this environment created a lot of blowback. and the question is whether policy moves like immigration reform, can they really cobble together any kind of bipartisan coalition? bush backed it, but will it now mean republicans support it? >> when we're talking with melody barnes, does he pick gun control or immigration? gun control being an issue that's highly polarized. immigration where you've got marko ruma marco rubio with ideas that jibe with the president. >> the thing about immigration, all dem
of franklin roosevelt where fdr in 1937 said be proud you're an individual but there's also a collective. and you guys mentioned the word people, how often he said, we, the people. but this is, we, the people almost in a howard zimm people of america kind of way. this was about ordinary people fighting for ordinary rights, stonewall has replaced normandy. you know, selma has replaced iwo jima. there wasn't a marshal tone, this was about inclusion. >> he used the term we, and he used the term common creed over and over again throughout the speech. norah o'donnell was listening to the speech down there on the national mall. nor norah? >> and, scott, on that theme the president used the word together some seven times. a word he used just once in 2009. and i think you're right, this was in some ways a civil rights speech. because the president said, our journey is not complete. that's the message on this martin luther king day. and he said when times change, so must we. so i think all of those things are right. and he said, you know, it's not what binds this nation together is not the color
. introducing new secret clinical strength stress response scent. ♪ >>> in 1933 franklin delano roosevelt was sworn in as president for the first of his four terms, and with these words he delivered an inaugural address that's been called the most important american speech of the 20th century. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> that voice rings true. anyway, fdr's first inaugural was the last to be held in march. the 20th amendment ratified in january of '33 moved all subsequent inaugurals to january so it would be colder, and we'll be right back. she keeps you >> i started using drugs when i was 12. i had genetic frontloading. i also had trauma. we know from the studies at n.i.h. that these two things together make you a real candidate for this disease. this book has the best information on the planet for people who have this or people who don't or people who think they might and know somebody. >> when do you know you're an addict? some people call them social drinkers, heavy drinkers. when do you reach the point where you say i can't c
: only two presidents have been sworn in on two separate occasions, franklin d. roosevelt and barack obama because of what happened in 2009. swearing in at noon eastern time today for the president, tomorrow is the public ceremony. vice-president joe biden will be sworn in within the next 10 minutes to 15 minutes from his residence. the flag in the center of your screen is the same one used in his ceremonial office. you can see two paintings. one is lincoln delivering his second inaugural address. one of the more memorable second inaugural addresses in history. guest: that is exactly right. the end of the civil war, leaving it the country at a press of this for which direction they could go. in his words, now the story is none, it set the groundwork for what he envisioned. historians have argued about how it was carried out and what may have been one of the world's greatest what ifs, if he had not been assassinated a few days later. let just a couple of miles to the white house, where the vice president and his official residence is located. the first vice-president of the president
bottle. >>> inform 1933 franklin delano roosevelt was sworn in as president for the first of his four terms and with these words he delivered an inaugural address that's been called the most important american speech of the 20th century. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> of that voice rings true. anyway, f dsmth r's first inall ral has the last to be healed in march. the 20th amendment ratified in the january of '33 moved all subsequent inaugurals to january so it would be colder and we'll be right back. [ nyquil bottle ] you know i relieve coughs, sneezing, fevers... [ tylenol bottle ] me too! and nasal congestion. [ tissue box ] he said nasal congestion. yeah...i heard him. [ female announcer ] tylenol® cold multi-symptom nighttime relieves nasal congestion. nyquil® cold and flu doesn't. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price.
announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> in 1933 franklin delano roosevelt was sworn in as president for the first of his four terms, and with these words he delivered an inaugural address that's been called the most important american speech of the 20th century. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> that voice rings true. anyway, fdr's first inaugural was the last to be held in march. the 20th amendment ratified in january of '33 moved all subsequent inaugurals to january so it would be colder, and we'll be right back. she keeps you guessing. it's part of what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - you know, that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditions and medications, and
a little more subdued. the am bithbitions are usually little lower. franklin d. roosevelt laid out a very ambitious agenda to help the common man in his second inaugural, but in general i think the president is a little bit chastened by the time of their second inaugural. >> washington only spoke 135 words. >> that guy really didn't want the job, huh? >> but he did anticipate twitter. >> that's 140 words. >> at mt. vernon. >> considered the greatest inaugural speech, lincoln's second inaugural speech is also brief and people at the time said where are the policy directives? what's he going to do? what's this forgiveness and providence? >> good speeches lasted for hours in the 19th century. that was entertainment. >> thank god times have changed. >> gentlemen, we want to circle back after tomorrow and see what you think of the moment and then maybe we'll circle back in 50 years, right, when we have a much better flavor of what this means. thank you for your help. >> thank you. >> as we noted a few minutes ago, latino voters were a huge part of reflecting president obama. that community add
, not tyranny, a president, not a king. and the first step of the president, the oath of office. >> i franklin, del nor roosevelt, do somlely swear i. i george walker bush. >> do solemnly swear. >> i barack hussein obama do solemnly swear. >> it's been taken over each president, usually over a bible with the eyes of the world watching. >> the office is the honor and the responsibility that is bestowed upon one individual to protect the united states, to protect the citizens of the united states, to honor the ideals of the constitution. >> george washington first added so help me god to the oath, a tradition president obammal continue as he takes that pledge once more on abraham lincoln's bible. our first president made a 250 mile journey on horseback and the nation celebrated a new dawn. >> this was the passing of power to a man who could have been king, but refused it. and then each successive inauguration was a celebration, even to today, to obama's inauguration, it's a celebration of that fact that twee didn't make our chief executive king. he wouldn't be a kick. he would pass it on. >> we
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)